« A Discussion About Recess | Main | Reading, Thinking, the Media and the Truth »

January 06, 2013

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e552af12578834017ee6fc77ce970d

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Writing about Teaching:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Amethyst, your diagram in your post of the "real writing process," which includes doing dishes, kids fighting in the corner, and eating M & Ms, really describes it! Writing about teaching is almost never a linear process for me, and I doubt it is for other teachers either!

http://amethysthintonsainz.blogspot.com/2013/01/mixed-metaphors-of-national-board.html?m=1

I think I'm going to share your diagram (I'll be sure to give you credit :) at my local National Board candidate cohort meeting next week--it's a great graphical description!

I love your post and the discussion it has prompted here! I am newly certified and was lucky enough to speak to a group of current candidates, and I focused on the writing process. My speech went a little something like this... http://amethysthintonsainz.blogspot.com/2013/01/mixed-metaphors-of-national-board.html

You're so right. As a language arts / history teacher I've always had to teach writing and do a lot of it for in-class examples, but all teachers need to write.

My daughter's first grade teacher puts out a weekly newsletter, my husband spends hours emailing parents and updating his classroom blog, and my colleagues in tech, art and science frequently write grants to get funding for projects our district (and state) won't pay for.

Funny that writing as a skill isn't even touched in most TEP programs.

You're awesome, Maren! Thanks!

Here's the actual statement from the "Explication of the NBPTS Policy Governing Use of National Board Certified Teacher Candidate Assessment Performances." It says, "a candidate or successful NBCT may not do any of the following: publish, or authorize the publication of, all or part of his or her portfolio or videotapes in any manner, whether printed or electronic, e.g. the Internet."

Best of luck on your renewal! Sounds like you are off to a great start with it.

Maren

Good point! I'm glad I asked you because I hadn't thought of that! I won't do it then.

Hi Al,
Honestly, I wouldn't do that. Your work needs to be original, and if you publish it in a very public fashion like that, the chances are too great that an unethical person might "borrow" too much of your work. If two very similar papers were submitted, the scorers would not know who was the original writer. For this reason, I would not give your papers to someone you don't know to read--I think publishing them publicly online counts as giving them to someone you don't know!

Hey Maren, your post got me thinking about something I started doing today. After finishing the rough draft for the first component of my national board renewal, which included a lot of the work I do online, I decided to share the different sections of my write-up as blog posts. Do you think that's okay? I mean, I won't get in trouble with the NBPTS will I? I think the odds that someone who gets to score my entries will read my blog.

Brian, good to hear from you! I am sure your inner dialogue is rich as you hike through the forests and climb to those mountain tops. Honestly, I think I get some of my best ideas when I am outside running.

Tom, I don't know about that, but, hey, I'll take the compliment! All kind words are welcome as school starts back up tomorrow morning.

You're right. I found I didn't like writing to keep up with a schedule, but I miss the introspection that it forced me to do. So now I try to have a rich inner dialogue.

Keep up the good work!

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment